The Innocents Abroad - Chapter 37

Title

The Innocents Abroad - Chapter 37
Summer Home of Royalty—Practising for the Dread Ordeal—Committee on Imperial Address—Reception by the Emperor and Family—Dresses of the Imperial Party—Concentrated Power—Counting the Spoons—At the Grand Duke's—A Charming Villa—A Knightly Figure—The Grand Duchess—A Grand Ducal Breakfast—Baker's Boy, the Famine-Breeder—Theatrical Monarchs a Fraud—Saved as by Fire—The Governor—General's Visit to the Ship—Official "Style"—Aristocratic Visitors—"Munchausenizing" with Them—Closing Ceremonies
 
 
 

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Comments

Submitted by scott on

According to Ian Strathcarron, in his prologue to Innocence and War, the real reason for the visit to Czar Alexander II was because the owners desired to sell the Quaker City and the royal family had expressed an interest in purchasing and making her their royal yacht.

Submitted by scott on

25 Aug QC arrived at Yalta at noon.
26 Aug QC party, including SLC, visited Tsar Aleksandr II and family.
28 Aug QC departed Yalta, 8:00 p.m.

Submitted by scott on

Twain was impressed with the Emperor's third brother, the Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (1831–1891). The Quaker City party was invited to his palace following their visit to the Emperor's residence. I have been unable to find the name or location of this palace. The Grand Duke's palace in St Petersburg is known as the Nicholas Palace. The specifics of this statement may be in error. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duke_Michael_Nikolaevich_of_Russia 13 October 1832 – 18 December 1909 and it states he was the owner of New Michael Palace on the Palace Quay in Saint Petersburg.

From the letter by Mary Mason Fairbanks, of October 18, 1867 (as published in the Mark Twain Journal v46), the company from the Quaker City visited his palace known as "Orlander".